Application program – Flwor Found http://flworfound.org/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 10:13:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://flworfound.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/flwor.png Application program – Flwor Found http://flworfound.org/ 32 32 The NJ has yet to launch a COVID relief program for homeowners. Why not? https://flworfound.org/the-nj-has-yet-to-launch-a-covid-relief-program-for-homeowners-why-not/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 09:01:43 +0000 https://flworfound.org/the-nj-has-yet-to-launch-a-covid-relief-program-for-homeowners-why-not/ David Alston lost 18 pounds by skipping meals to save money while he waited six months for his delayed unemployment checks. He used up his $ 5,000 in savings and racked up $ 1,600 in debt on his cable bill before canceling the service. But his biggest concern was losing thousands of dollars in paying […]]]>

David Alston lost 18 pounds by skipping meals to save money while he waited six months for his delayed unemployment checks.

He used up his $ 5,000 in savings and racked up $ 1,600 in debt on his cable bill before canceling the service.

But his biggest concern was losing thousands of dollars in paying property taxes for the house he lives in, which his family bought fifty years ago in Iselin, a three square mile community in Woodbridge Township.

“I will die before I lose my parents’ house,” said Alston, 62.

To help homeowners across the country like Alston survive the financial turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the federal government has set aside nearly $ 10 billion in a “Homeowners Assistance Fund”Nestled in the massive US bailout stimulus package.

But nearly ten months later, few states have launched applicationportals for the program, not to mention checks to help low-income families cover mortgage and interest payments, home insurance, utility payments and property taxes.

David Alston, 62, had problems getting money from unemployment and was behind in paying his property taxes for his Iselin house.  Monday, January 10, 2022

The agency administering the $ 325 million fund in the Garden State – the New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency – told NorthJersey.com that the US Treasury Department had approved the New Jersey plan submitted in August, but it will still be weeks before the program’s portal is open to the public.

“We plan to provide more information in an official announcement in the coming weeks, which will ensure that landlords are able to collect the relevant documents and start engaging with contracted housing advisers to secure a assistance before the portal opens, “said Jonathan Sternesky, head of policy. and legislative affairs of the agency.

Need a warm place tonight?: Here are the local warming centers of NJ

New Jersey: How will the NJ prevent the “avalanche” of foreclosures once the moratorium is lifted?

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Unqork Gets California Software Licensing Program Agreement https://flworfound.org/unqork-gets-california-software-licensing-program-agreement/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:30:23 +0000 https://flworfound.org/unqork-gets-california-software-licensing-program-agreement/

NEW YORK – January 11, 2022 Unqork, the leading enterprise code-less platform, today announced that Unqork is now an Approved Software Licensing Program (SLP) vendor in the State of California. The contract simplifies the procurement process for state and local agencies in California, allowing them to leverage Unqork’s codeless platform to build business-grade critical software in a codeless architecture.

Administered by the California Department of General Services, the SLP program establishes pre-negotiated contracts with software vendors, reducing the burden of the procurement process for individual departments. As an approved SLP provider, Unqork’s codeless platform will be readily available to agencies across the state of California, enabling them to build, deploy, and manage complex applications without writing a single line of code.

Unqork’s platform can help governments innovate in licensing, authorization and regulatory workflows; virtualize in-person services; perform complex services and case management; and more. With Unqork’s drag-and-drop interface, engineers can build and deploy software faster, dramatically reducing development time and cost of ownership, while providing much-needed relief to understaffed technical teams.

“In an age when virtual government services are vital to every community, Unqork’s code-less enterprise platform enables governments to quickly deliver mission-critical applications to the people they serve,” said Clint Buytenhuys, vice-president -State and local president, Unqork. “Receiving contracts such as the California SLP is a critical step in simplifying the procurement process for California government departments to acquire the Unqork platform, enabling them to quickly deliver internal and external government services at scale. “

Work alongside Unqork, based in Sacramento Cutting-edge advocacy contributed to this effort to rationalize access to the Unqork platform. Unqork solutions are accessible on the SLP via these reseller partners: Allied network solutions, Carahsoft Technology Corp®, Simplified solutions.

To learn more about Unqork’s work in the public sector, visit unqork.com.

About Unqork

Unqork is the industry-leading no-code enterprise application platform that helps large enterprises build, deploy, and manage complex applications without writing a single line of code. Organizations like Goldman Sachs, Liberty Mutual, New York City, Chicago and Washington, DC, and Maimonides Medical Center use Unqork’s drag-and-drop interface to build business applications faster, with higher quality and lower costs than conventional approaches. To learn more, please visit: https://www.unqork.com.

Media contact:

Dana davis

comms@unqork.com

Unqork

Life as a technology leader in government has never been so difficult. On the one hand, citizens demand streamlined and sophisticated digital experiences, while on the other hand, you need to support the functionality of old, obsolete systems. Outdated paper processes can make this transition even more difficult. Hiring more staff helps, but it’s not a lasting solution.

See more stories by Unqork

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Trilogy Metals announces 2022 schedule and budget for Upper Kobuk mining projects and provides update on Arctic permits https://flworfound.org/trilogy-metals-announces-2022-schedule-and-budget-for-upper-kobuk-mining-projects-and-provides-update-on-arctic-permits/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://flworfound.org/trilogy-metals-announces-2022-schedule-and-budget-for-upper-kobuk-mining-projects-and-provides-update-on-arctic-permits/ VANCOUVER, BC, January 11, 2022 / CNW / – Trilogy Metals Inc. (TSX: TMQ) (NYSE American: TMQ) (“Trilogy” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that Ambler Metals LLC (“Ambler Metals”), the operating joint venture equally owned by Trilogy and a wholly owned subsidiary of South32 Limited (ASX: S32) (LSE: S32) (JSE: S32) (ADR: SOUHY) […]]]>

VANCOUVER, BC, January 11, 2022 / CNW / – Trilogy Metals Inc. (TSX: TMQ) (NYSE American: TMQ) (“Trilogy” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that Ambler Metals LLC (“Ambler Metals”), the operating joint venture equally owned by Trilogy and a wholly owned subsidiary of South32 Limited (ASX: S32) (LSE: S32) (JSE: S32) (ADR: SOUHY) (“South32”), approved the 2022 program and budget of approximately $ 28.5 million for the advancement of Upper Kobuk (“UKMP”) mining projects located at Northwest Alaska. The budget is 100% funded by Ambler Metals and has been confirmed by the NANA / Ambler Metals oversight committee. All amounts are in US dollars.

Highlights of the 2022 approved program

  • About $ 28.5 million budget fully funded by Ambler Metals

  • Up to 10,000 meters to be split between resource development drilling at the Arctic project and priority exploration targets ready for drilling in the district

  • Engineering studies advancing the Arctic project

  • Filing of the Federal 404 permit application in early 2022

Arctic and UKMP drilling program proposed in 2022

A two-day technical review of the 2021 exploration program, involving geologists from Trilogy, South32 and Ambler Metals, took place at Fairbanks, Alaska to December 8 and 9, 2021. Ambler Metals presented the technical results received to date and a preliminary outline of the 2022 exploration program. A comprehensive technical review of the 2021 exploration results and the ranking of drill targets and target areas for The 2022 field season will take place in early 2022 once all test results have been received, compiled and interpreted.

The 2022 budget for Ambler Metals, approved by owners, Trilogy and South32, will cover up to 10,000 meters of helicopter-borne diamond drilling scheduled to begin in early June. Footage will be split between Arctic resource development drilling and reconnaissance drilling for the two volcanic massive sulphide (“VMS”) targets in the Ambler Belt, with a focus on targets near the Ambler Belt. ‘Arctic, and the carbonate-coated copper targets around Bornite and the Cosmos Hills. . An increased field effort to identify and assess new drill targets, including the use of ground and downhole electromagnetic (EM) surveys, is planned.

Arctic permit

An independent consulting firm completed a review of the preparation of the draft license dossier for the Arctic project and presented the results of this review to the technical teams at South32 and Trilogy. The review concluded that Ambler Metals’ licensing strategy is sound and that the license package can proceed with minor modifications. Ambler Metals is now making the recommended changes to the permit dossier and plans to file the permit application, which will initiate the official authorization process for the Arctic Project, with the United States Army Corps. engineers (“USACE”) in early 2022.

Since the Arctic Project is located on public and private land, the primary federal permit will be the 404 Dredging or Backfill Permit issued by USACE, the lead agency during the federal clearance process. The licensing process will be carried out in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Law. Along with the federal authorization process, the State of Alaska, specifically the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, will be the state agencies responsible for issuing the state permits which include mine operating permit, air quality permit, dam construction and operation. Permit, and the Water Discharge Permit. Other permits will also be issued by the North West Arctic Borough. The Company expects to file the permit application in the first quarter of 2022, and the overall permit process is expected to take 24 to 30 months.

More details on the proposed 2022 program and the schedule for obtaining Arctic permits will be made public in early 2022.

Tony Giardini, President and CEO of Trilogy, commented, “We are delighted to continue to make progress in reducing the risk of the Arctic project and that we are now very close to starting formal authorization activities. Senior management at Trilogy Metals are working closely with representatives from South32 and Ambler Metals to design a 2022 program that will greatly help move the Arctic project forward and continue to add value with the drill bit. We believe 2022 will be another important year for the company. “

Qualified people

Richard Gosse, vice-president exploration for Trilogy, is a qualified person as defined by National Instrument 43-101. Mr. Gosse has reviewed the scientific and technical information contained in this press release and agrees with the disclosure it contains.

About Trilogy Metals

Trilogy Metals Inc. is a metals exploration and development company which owns a 50 percent interest in Ambler Metals LLC which owns a 100 percent interest in the Upper Kobuk (“UKMP”) mining projects in Northwest Alaska. At December 19, 2019, South32, a globally diversified mining and metallurgical company, has exercised its option to form a 50/50 joint venture with Trilogy. UKMP is located in the Ambler Mining District, one of the richest and most promising copper-dominated districts, located in one of the most secure geopolitical jurisdictions in the world. It is home to world-class polymetallic VMS deposits that contain copper, zinc, lead, gold and silver, and alternate carbonate deposits that harbor high-grade copper and cobalt mineralization . Exploration efforts have focused on two deposits in the Ambler mining district: the Arctic VMS deposit and the replacement Bornite carbonate deposit. The two deposits are located in a set of land that covers approximately 181,387 hectares. Ambler Metals has an agreement with NANA Regional Corporation, Inc., an Alaskan Indigenous company that provides a framework for exploration and potential development of the Ambler mining district in cooperation with local communities. Trilogy’s vision is to develop the Ambler mining district into a leading copper producer in North America.

Caution regarding forward-looking statements

This press release includes certain “forward-looking information” and “forward-looking statements” (collectively “forward-looking statements”) within the meaning of Canadian laws and United States securities laws, including the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, included herein, including, without limitation, statements relating to expected expenses and drilling, surveying and other activities planned on the Company’s premises. properties and timing and objectives thereof, timing of submission and licensing, the Company’s ability to reduce the risks of the Arctic Project and unlock the mineral potential of the VMS mineral belt and future performance of the Company are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are frequently, but not always, identified by words such as “expects”, “anticipates”, “believes”, “intends”, “believes”, “possible”, “possible” and similar expressions or statements that events, conditions or results “shall”, “may”, “could” or “should” occur or be achieved. Forward-looking statements involve various risks and uncertainties. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate, and actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the Company’s expectations include uncertainties regarding the success of exploration activities, authorization timelines, additional capital requirements, government regulation of mining operations, environmental risks, prices of energy inputs, labor, materials, supplies and services, uncertainties associated with the interpretation of drilling and geological test results, unexpected cost increases and other risks and uncertainties disclosed in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended November 30, 2020 filed with Canadian securities regulatory authorities and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission and in other Company reports and documents filed with applicable securities regulatory authorities from time to time. The Company’s forward-looking statements reflect the beliefs, opinions and projections as of the date on which the statements are made. The Company assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements or beliefs, opinions, projections or other factors, if they change, except as required by law.

Cision

Show original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/trilogy-metals-announces-the-2022-program-and-budget-for-the-upper-kobuk-mineral-projects-and–provides-update-on -arctic-permit-301457992.html

SOURCE Trilogy Metals Inc.

Cision

Cision

Show original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/January2022/11/c0343.html

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Kupu opens applications for Youth Conservation Corps summer program https://flworfound.org/kupu-opens-applications-for-youth-conservation-corps-summer-program/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 01:34:00 +0000 https://flworfound.org/kupu-opens-applications-for-youth-conservation-corps-summer-program/ Applications are open for the Kupu Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps Summer Program, which offers intensive hands-on experience in all of the islands. The summer program runs for seven weeks from June 7 to July 22, 2022. If selected, participants are matched into a team of 5-7 other like-minded people. Each week, they will be able […]]]>

Applications are open for the Kupu Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps Summer Program, which offers intensive hands-on experience in all of the islands.

The summer program runs for seven weeks from June 7 to July 22, 2022. If selected, participants are matched into a team of 5-7 other like-minded people. Each week, they will be able to explore and serve at a different partner site, which offers new adventures, challenges, teachings and opportunities for personal growth.

Participants will learn about a variety of ecosystems, natural resource management techniques and cultural practices unique to Hawai’i.

This year, Kupu, a non-profit conservation and youth education organization, invites applicants from Kaua’i, Moloka’i, O’ahu, Maui and Hawai’i Island to apply online. The deadline to apply is February 25.

“There are two ways to participate, either as a team member or a team leader,” said Graeme Lander, Kupu recruiting coordinator. “Team members are usually between 17 and 22 years old and don’t necessarily need previous environmental experience. The ideal candidate is someone with a positive attitude, curious about nature, interested in learning, and eager to strengthen their community through service.

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Team members receive first aid and CPR certification, a monetary stipend of $ 500, and an AmeriCorps education award of $ 1,374 (similar to a scholarship). They also gain valuable experiential environmental education; establish close relationships with their peers; and acquire life skills relevant to any career.

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Team leaders must be 21 by June 7, due to rental car requirements, and have a valid driver’s license. They are paid an hourly wage of $ 12.50 with benefits, plus overtime, if applicable. They also receive first aid and CPR certification and 4-5 days of specialist workshops on leadership, safety and logistics, and program / fieldwork preparation on O’ahu.

“Team leaders don’t mind the added responsibilities,” Graeme adds. “They are the backbone of the team, responsible for assisting, coordinating and inspiring members on a daily basis. Ideally, leaders are 21 and older, have experience leading groups, and have knowledge of native plants and unique Hawaiian customs. They play a critical role in the success of the program and in shaping the membership experience.

Former summer program attendee Kristi Kimura from Maui said, “Being able to visit places that many cannot and making a positive impact on the land and culture I call home was the best part. by HYCC. [Hawaiʻi Youth Conservation Corps]. I discovered the many different paths within sustainability and conservation to better understand what I would like to pursue a future career in. This program influenced my future plans by consolidating what I would like to pursue as a career. Kupu provided a very humbling experience that a lot of people aren’t fortunate enough to have.

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Former HYCC participant Mikela Parris from Molokaʻi added: “I think each site has done a very good job in educating us about the history of the place and making us feel included. I love hearing our seniors talk about their past experiences and how it shaped them into who they are today. I learned how important stewardship is and how important it is to remove invasive species so that our native ecosystems can thrive. It’s hard work, but it’s important. ”

For questions, e-mail [email protected] or dial 808-735-1221 ext 2001.

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Attorney General’s Office Announces Affordable Internet Service Connectivity Program – Los Alamos Reporter https://flworfound.org/attorney-generals-office-announces-affordable-internet-service-connectivity-program-los-alamos-reporter/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 16:31:23 +0000 https://flworfound.org/attorney-generals-office-announces-affordable-internet-service-connectivity-program-los-alamos-reporter/ PRESS RELEASE FROM THE AG OFFICE New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas announced his office was working to raise awareness of the new affordable connectivity program, recently launched by the Federal Communications Commission. The new $ 14 billion affordable connectivity program has a long-term benefit that will help lower the cost of broadband service for […]]]>

PRESS RELEASE FROM THE AG OFFICE

New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas announced his office was working to raise awareness of the new affordable connectivity program, recently launched by the Federal Communications Commission. The new $ 14 billion affordable connectivity program has a long-term benefit that will help lower the cost of broadband service for eligible households who are struggling to afford Internet service.

Qualifying households are encouraged to apply to receive up to $ 30 per month off internet service and up to $ 75 per month for households on qualifying tribal lands. Eligible households can also benefit from a one-time discount of up to $ 100 towards the purchase of a laptop, desktop or tablet from participating providers if they contribute more than $ 10. $ and less than $ 50 at the purchase price.

“At a time when New Mexico’s digital divide is one of the worst in the country, the Affordable Connectivity Program can help students in our communities who suffer from a lack of Internet access,” the attorney said. General Balderas. “I am pleased that the federal government is taking action to ensure that our most vulnerable populations have equal access to the Internet and to education.

A household is eligible for the Affordable Connectivity Program if a household member meets at least a of the following criteria:

  • Has an income of 200% or less of federal poverty guidelines;
  • Participates in certain assistance programs, such as SNAP, Medicaid, Federal Public Housing Assistance, SSI, WIC or Lifeline;
  • Participate in one of the many tribal specific programs, such as General Assistance from the Office of Indian Affairs, Tribal TANF or the Indian Reserve Food Distribution Program;
  • is approved to receive benefits under the Free and Discounted School Lunch Program or the School Breakfast Program, including through the USDA Community Eligibility Provision during the school year 2019-2020, 2020-2021 or 2021-2022;
  • Received a Federal Pell Grant in the current award year; Where
  • Meets the eligibility criteria for the existing low income program of a participating provider.

Eligible households can sign up now through a participating broadband service provider or by visiting ACPBenefit.org to submit a request online or print a request by mail. Additional information on broadband emergency delivery is available at www.fcc.gov/ACP, or by calling (877) 384-2575.

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BUSINESS DOCUMENTS: applications for the Youth Leadership Program are open; Lee Bank announces beneficiaries; MountainOne acquires Cross Insurance; Jewish federations adds Meador https://flworfound.org/business-documents-applications-for-the-youth-leadership-program-are-open-lee-bank-announces-beneficiaries-mountainone-acquires-cross-insurance-jewish-federations-adds-meador/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 05:03:45 +0000 https://flworfound.org/business-documents-applications-for-the-youth-leadership-program-are-open-lee-bank-announces-beneficiaries-mountainone-acquires-cross-insurance-jewish-federations-adds-meador/ Second-year students of any Berkshires school and home-schooled equivalent age students can apply for 1Berkshires Youth Leadership Program until February 11. BYLP 2019 Cohort Photo Courtesy of 1Berkshire 1Applications for Berkshire Youth Leadership Class 2022-2023 are open PITTSFIELD – 1Berkshire’s Berkshire Youth Leadership Program has relaunched and is accepting applications for the YLP class of […]]]>

Second-year students of any Berkshires school and home-schooled equivalent age students can apply for 1Berkshires Youth Leadership Program until February 11. BYLP 2019 Cohort Photo Courtesy of 1Berkshire

1Applications for Berkshire Youth Leadership Class 2022-2023 are open

PITTSFIELD – 1Berkshire’s Berkshire Youth Leadership Program has relaunched and is accepting applications for the YLP class of 2022-23.

The 1Berkshire Youth Leadership Program, open to all current sophomores in the Berkshires, selects a cohort of 30 motivated students from all walks of life for a 10-month experience that will allow them to explore the regional economy and develop their leadership skills. Once selected, students will begin the program with a 3-day, 3-night retreat from June 9 to 12 at the end of their second year. At the retreat, students will meet for the first time, begin to make connections, and learn and advance their individual leadership skills.

Over the next 10 months, students will meet again for a full day each month at various locations across the Berkshires (or virtually, in extreme weather conditions). During these sessions, students will meet with business leaders and community members to learn about sectors and careers in the regional economy, including, but not limited to, advanced manufacturing. , healthcare, non-profit organizations and community services, the creative economy, hospitality and tourism. Students will develop leadership traits through activities during the sessions and, as a class, will develop and execute a collective community impact project that will improve life in the Berkshires.

This program is made possible by the continued financial support of Berkshire Bank, Greylock Federal Credit Union and others. The 1Berkshire Youth Leadership Program is coordinated by 1Berkshire with the support of the Volunteer Youth Leadership Program Steering Committee, made up of professionals from across the region who dedicate their time and expertise to develop and facilitate the overall program.

Until the February 11 deadline, sophomores of any school in the Berkshires and equivalent age home-schooled students can submit a request for the program.

—AK

* * *

Lee Bank Foundation announces fourth quarter community funding

LEE Lee Bank Foundation awarded $ 68,560 to 12 organizations in the Berkshire region in its 4th round of 2021 Community Grants. Recipients have received grants ranging from $ 1,000 to $ 20,000 to support their local programming. The awards include a series of arts access grants for arts and culture organizations to expand access to programming for underserved audiences.

The following organizations have received funding from the Lee Bank Foundation:

  • 18 degrees
  • Barrington Theater Company
  • Berkshire Busk!
  • Berkshire Community Action Council
  • Berkshire Immigration Center
  • IS183 School of Fine Arts
  • Latinas413
  • South Berkshire Literacy Network
  • Mass MoCA
  • NAACP Berkshire County Branch
  • Youth project of the railway street
  • Youth Education and Sport Initiative (YES)

Arts Access Grants of $ 1,000 each have been awarded to Berkshire Busk! and the IS183 art school.

In its first year, the Lee Bank Foundation received over 90 grant applications for its four funding cycles. The deadline for the first round of funding for the 2022 Foundation is March 1. The app and more information can be found on the Community Impact Section from the Lee Bank website.

To be considered for grants, applicants must be a non-profit organization (501) (c) (3). The Foundation focuses on funding programs that aim to bridge the income and opportunity gaps in our region. Funding requests must reflect one or more of the Foundation’s main areas of intervention:

  • Education and Literacy
  • Food security and nutrition
  • Economic growth and development
  • Health and personal services
  • Mentoring, internship and “school to work” initiatives
  • Arts and culture

Applicants can only submit one application per 12 month period.

—AK

* * *

MountainOne announces the acquisition of Cross Insurance in Pittsfield

Photo courtesy of MountainOne

PITTSFIELDMountainOne Insurance Agency recently announced the acquisition of Cross Insurance in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. This acquisition makes MountainOne Insurance the largest agency based in the Berkshires in terms of clients under management. MountainOne plans to retain the entire Cross Insurance team, which will bring the combined agency to 50 employees at six locations in Berkshire County.

“The acquisition of Cross Insurance reinforces MountainOne’s commitment to the communities we serve,” said Jonathan Denmark, President and COO of MountainOne Insurance Agency. “The combined agency will now be able to offer products and solutions from an expanded list of insurance companies.”

Cross Insurance was formed in 2016 when Cross purchased Bardwell, Bowlby & Karam Insurance Agency and Colt Insurance Agency, both located in Pittsfield. “Although the name will change to MountainOne Insurance, the location will remain at 101 South Street in Pittsfield. We are delighted to expand our presence in downtown Pittsfield and continue the traditions of excellence for which Cross and previous agencies were known, ”said Denmark.

MountainOne has been helping clients navigate the banking, insurance and investing landscape for nearly two centuries. It has deep roots in Berkshire County with MountainOne Insurance dating back to 1867 and MountainOne Bank to 1848. For generations MountainOne and the original companies that make up the modern entity have been dedicated to customer service and the provision of valuable financial solutions.

—AK

* * *

Jewish Federation Adds Molly Meador as Volunteer Coordinator, PJ Library

Molly Meador. Photo courtesy of the Jewish Federation

PITTSFIELD – The Jewish Federation of Berkshires recently announced the appointment of Molly Meador as the PJ Volunteer and Library Coordinator. In his new role, Meador will further develop the network of volunteers committed to the work of the Federation and oversee the local PJ Library program, which provides free Jewish-themed books and music for children, and organizes fun family outings. and educational.

Meador moved with his family to the Brooklyn Berkshires in 2020 and has held administrative, production and creative roles with theater companies in New York City. She recently worked as a producer for the Keen Company’s Teen Festival and as an Associate Artistic Director for TheatreworksUSA. In addition, she has worked with the Atlantic Acting School, the Signature Theater Company, and the Manhattan Theater Club.

Meador graduated from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., Where she earned a bachelor’s degree in communications and majored in theater. She has also been a guest teacher / artist at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy (AMDA), NYU-Collaborative Arts Project 21 (CAP21), Stella Adler Studio, NYU Steinhardt School, and SUNY New Paltz.

PJ Library, a program of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, is locally funded by the Jewish Federation of Berkshires with support from the Spitz Tuchman Family Fund and the Jewish Women’s Foundation of the Berkshires. The program provides free monthly books and music with Jewish content to children aged 6 months to 8 years.

—AK

]]> Savannah high school student creates mentorship program https://flworfound.org/savannah-high-school-student-creates-mentorship-program/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:07:29 +0000 https://flworfound.org/savannah-high-school-student-creates-mentorship-program/ SAVANE, Georgia. When the COVID-19 pandemic struck in 2020, Savannah Arts Academy student Ava Dorminey decided she wanted to help students who might be struggling with the pandemic. She thought of a school supply drive or a mentoring program. “I wanted to create an organization that targets the academic aspect, but also a mentorship program […]]]>

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck in 2020, Savannah Arts Academy student Ava Dorminey decided she wanted to help students who might be struggling with the pandemic. She thought of a school supply drive or a mentoring program.

“I wanted to create an organization that targets the academic aspect, but also a mentorship program that would instill qualities such as leadership, confidence and teamwork,” she said.

By creating the Students Helping Students Succeed or SHSS organization in its first year, Dorminey hopes it will meet the needs of children in Savannah and Chatham County. She said it was created to help elementary school students academically and socially in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thirty-two students from nine different high schools in the region are part of SHSS. Students come from Savannah Arts Academy, Groves High School, Windsor Forest High School, Savannah Christian Preparatory School, Calvary Day School, Savannah-Chatham E-Learning Academy, New Hampstead High School, Woodville Tompkins High School, and Savannah Country Day School.

She said interested students will need to complete an application and that some qualities of a candidate will include leadership.

“So it’s really like all the students in the Savannah area are helping other students,” she said.

The goal is to help teachers fill the learning gaps COVID-19 has caused for SCCPSS students, she said. She explained that high school students would help younger students by tutoring them, helping them complete their homework, and serving as a role model and mentor.

She said her organization will also partner with teachers and provide additional help with tutorials or an after-school program.

“I thought COVID would only accelerate the problem… it looks like there must be something else,” she said. “From there I got the idea of ​​how I can help students in a way that is not only educational, but strengthens their character.”

Dorminey brought up the idea of ​​starting SHSS because of her experience volunteering at the Isle of Hope Methodist Church E-Learning Academy. She spent five months at church working with kindergarten and first grade students.

During her time there, she assisted students with tutoring, coursework, and media issues. She found that some students did not get the same quality of education.

“It really helped me because they were students from all the different schools and they kind of noticed the difference in the quality of education,” she said. “You had students from schools where the teachers were a bit scattered, you know, and I thought, you know, well, COVID is only going to accelerate this problem, so it looks like something else needs to be done.”

TO START

Dorminey said that to start her organization, she had the help of her counselor and Stacy Jennings, communications director for the Savannah-Chatham County public school system. She also called counselors in every high school to spread the word.

She also wanted to have a mentoring component for her organization, to target high school students. The plan was to launch the mentorship program last fall, but she was unable to do so due to pandemic restrictions. Dorminey said the plan is to start the program this month.

The mentoring program will take place primarily on Zoom.

HSS will also host group meetings and breakout sessions with middle school students that would help them develop different traits such as leadership, self-esteem and work ethic.

She said middle school students will be matched with a student from SHSS after filling out a form asking them about their interests and personality.

Dorminey chose to focus on college because she remembers being that age and how difficult it was for her.

“College has been a tough time for me, and I kind of wish I had someone to talk to,” she said.

The organization organized a clean-up day at a local primary school, during which SHSS students raked, trimmed bushes, painted and electrically washed the exterior of a school. The organization has organized a Christmas gift replenishment campaign in which students will distribute Christmas gifts, including school supplies, art supplies and educational games, she said.

Future events include:

– Sports Equipment Drive in January: focus on students from low-income families.

– Children’s Book Collection in April: SHSS pupils will collect books for pupils and, if possible, help elementary pupils to choose a book.

– Field Day in May: SHSS students will help elementary teachers and schools to organize / lead the field day, provide assistance to teachers and participate in outdoor games.

Dorminey understands that academics are important, but she also wanted to serve her community.

“I want to leave a legacy here and I have the impression that sometimes you don’t necessarily do it by having A rights, it’s also about creating a good school culture and helping others”, a- she declared. “Sometimes I have to take a step back and say what I really want to do with my time here.”

Passing the torch

Dorminey said she didn’t want her organization to die upon graduation, so she created a leadership team to continue the work she started. The team includes a chairperson and a co-chairperson roles.

“I created the position of co-chair because I want this organization to continue even after I graduate,” she said. “I feel like that’s what a lot of people lack when they start organizations in high school. You need to make sure that the torch stays on, even after you leave.

She said most student organizations in schools need a teacher or school staff member to serve as an advisor, but since SHSS doesn’t actually have any meetings, none are required. . SHSS carries out service-based projects.

SHSS meets via zoom as program students attend different schools.

Hannah Demmler, senior at Savannah Arts Academy, said she got involved after watching young children face so many challenges during the pandemic. She is currently the president of the organization.

“I have a 7 year old brother and I just saw so many issues that kids his age face because a lot of people weren’t used to staring at a screen for eight hours,” she said. .

Demmler said she enjoys the way SHSS helps her connect with other students and see the needs of the community.

“My eyes were kind of open because I didn’t know there were so many groups at a disadvantage in the county,” she said. “I was kind of like a student in my own bubble at Savannah Arts, so I really wasn’t used to other people’s problems.”

Dorminey said SHSS is linked to its goal of having a 100% sustainable hotel. Another reason was that she wanted to be an inspiration to other children.

“I want to help other kids feel comfortable with themselves, sort of find what they like and be able to continue like clubs and extracurricular activities,” she said. “Even start their own club based on their interests and what they like to do. “

Dorminey said she had to rely on faith to keep going, and she thanks those who helped her. Seeing all of her hard work come together is what Dorminey takes away from helping her community.

“I think it’s really rewarding to see that like wow we’re really doing something here, we’re actually helping other people,” she said.

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Serbo-American Cooperation Grants Program 2022 Funding Opportunity https://flworfound.org/serbo-american-cooperation-grants-program-2022-funding-opportunity/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 08:55:02 +0000 https://flworfound.org/serbo-american-cooperation-grants-program-2022-funding-opportunity/ Deadline: March 31, 2022 This notice is subject to the availability of funds. The Public Diplomacy Section (PDS) of the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade announces competition open to individuals and organizations to submit nominations for the Serbo-American Cooperation Grants Program. Program objectives: PDS accepts creative and engaging project proposals that align with the primary goals […]]]>

Deadline: March 31, 2022

This notice is subject to the availability of funds.

The Public Diplomacy Section (PDS) of the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade announces competition open to individuals and organizations to submit nominations for the Serbo-American Cooperation Grants Program.

Program objectives:

PDS accepts creative and engaging project proposals that align with the primary goals of the U.S. Embassy. This includes strengthening Serbo-American relations and explaining American culture, society, values ​​and policies to the Serbian public. The Embassy also works with the Serbian government, civil society, business and other partners to promote economic development and fight brain drain; strengthen democracy, in particular by supporting civic participation; encourage a free press and human rights; and advance regional stability and cooperation. Progress in these areas should help Serbia on its way to its stated goal of European Union (EU) membership.

Projects funded by this NOFO must include an American element. This could involve a connection or partnership between Serbian and American organizations or institutions; invite an American expert to participate, in person or virtually, in your project; host a program to examine Serbo-American shared values, national interests, etc .; or by incorporating an American approach or method to address a challenge facing your community, institution or profession.

Grant activities can take the form of academic competitions, summer camps (focused on the study of languages, sports, etc.), cross-border exchanges, conferences, workshops, courses, program design, exhibits, hackathons or application development, online projects, trial moot competitions, simulations and role-playing activities (e.g. congress model, United Nations model), festivals cinema or theater, performances or other activities.

Projects must start no earlier than July 1, 2022 and no later than July 1, 2022. All activities and your project assessment or appraisal must be completed within 18 months. Activities should focus on the public in Serbia. However, applicants may include participants or partners from neighboring countries of the Western Balkans, if this supports the objectives of the project. (See “Participants and Audiences” below.)

Serbo-American Cooperation Grant proposals (SAC) should be developed with a SMART logic model. The objective of your activity should be: Sspecific, Mmeasurable, Afeasible, Rrelevant to the problem or challenge, and Ttime based which means you will meet them on a certain date.

In accordance with Executive Decree on the Promotion of Racial Equity and Underserved Communities, proposals must demonstrate how the program advances equity with respect to race, ethnicity, religion, income, geography, gender identity, sexual orientation and disability. The proposal should also demonstrate how the program will promote engagement in underserved communities and with individuals from underserved communities. Proposals should demonstrate how addressing racial equity and underserved communities will improve the goals and objectives of the program, as well as the experience of participants.

In light of social distancing measures and to limit the spread of COVID-19, we welcome proposals that use video conferencing, distance learning tools, etc. If your proposal includes in-person activities, please consider including contingency plans, if the health situation requires social distancing measures to be in place during the grant period.

Beneficiaries are expected to: publicize your activities, including through social media and / or traditional media; and underscore the support of the US Embassy, ​​with our logo included on project related documents.

Program themes

The Embassy is seeking applications focusing on the themes below. We have included ideas on what your project could do, but we welcome creative approaches and activities.

  • Fight the brain drain: through entrepreneurship, innovation and / or tourism promotion.
    • Take advantage of Serbia’s historical and cultural sites, including past recipients of Ambassadorial Fund for the Preservation of Culture (AFCP) grants, and / or its natural treasures (e.g. parks, rivers, mountains, land agriculture, vineyards, etc.) to attract more tourists and promote economic development.
    • Promotion of entrepreneurship, innovation, study of STEM (science, technology, environment and mathematics) subjects and business development skills, including activities specifically focused on women, youth, minorities, members of other disadvantaged groups and / or underserved communities, especially in small towns and rural areas.
    • Protection of intellectual property rights to help entrepreneurs, inventors and artists generate income from their ideas, innovations, inventions and works.
    • Practical, useful and realistic strategies and approaches to help Serbian businesses and communities to recover economically in the post-coronavirus period.
  • Equal Opportunities for People with Disabilities (PWD): Inclusion and Advocacy in Education, Workforce, Civic Participation and Social Interaction.
    • Generating a wider awareness and discussion of the challenges faced by the disabled community in publicizing the activities and successes of the disabled community in Serbia; showcase best practices from NGOs, government offices, schools, institutions and unions; or learn from the US struggle to expand the rights of people with disabilities that can be adapted and enforced in Serbia.
    • Advocate for better access for people with disabilities to opportunities in education, employment, sports, civic engagement, public policy debates, culture and other areas, including teachers and schools that provide quality education for children with learning disabilities; and communities that minimize or remove physical barriers to people with disabilities and provide easier access for the deaf / hard of hearing and the blind / visually impaired.
  • Human rights. PDS hosts projects focused on women’s rights and the promotion of equality for ethnic and religious minorities, the LGBTQI community, refugees and migrants, and other disadvantaged or vulnerable populations.
  • Serbo-American ties. PDS hosts projects that inform and educate the public in Serbia about the historical, cultural, scientific and people-to-people ties between our two countries.
    • Highlight the cooperation and contributions of the citizens of the two countries in different sectors (economic, governance, security, health, science, education, culture, etc.), in the past or currently;
    • Publicize joint efforts to combat global issues such as climate change, disease, terrorism, human trafficking, international crime;
    • Explain and promote debate on current US policies towards Serbia, the region and Europe;
    • Explore the intersection of national interests of Serbia and America;
    • Examine the benefits of past and current cooperation and coordination with US and Western institutions (including the EU), US aid and / or investments in Serbia; examine the impact of people-to-people contacts on our two countries, particularly through immigration and / or exchange programs;
    • Highlight our common attitudes and shared values, including our faith in democracy, our commitment to academic research, etc.
  • Regional cooperation / Find common solutions to common problems.
    • Identify common approaches to solve the problems or challenges currently facing the Balkan region, for example, in education, environmental protection, tackling brain drain, tourism promotion, planning crisis, protection of human rights, etc.
    • Broaden and strengthen the links of professional societies and Serbian civil society organizations with their counterparts in the Balkan region;
    • Promote mutual understanding, tolerance and respect among the peoples of the Western Balkans;
    • Support the normalization of relations between Pristina and Belgrade, including projects focusing on education, environment, economy, etc.
  • Promotion of innovative or interactive teaching methods, teaching by students or projects, in class or outside, and / or development of educational television, radio, online and video games programs, focusing on:
    • civic education
    • promote the active engagement of citizens, including young people, in the democratic process;
    • broaden students’ understanding of central and local government structures, policy making, representative government and their rights and responsibilities as citizens in a democratic society;
    • examine the role of non-governmental institutions, including the media, business and civil society, in policy making;
    • involve students in debates on issues of public interest;
    • examine the role Serbia plays or can play in diplomacy, promoting regional and global stability and / or combating global issues, such as crime, terrorism, human trafficking, disease, etc. .
    • fight anti-Semitism through Holocaust education.
    • promoting tolerance and understanding among people of different ethnic or religious backgrounds, who are disabled, from the LGBTQI community or other disadvantaged or vulnerable population.
    • promotion of gender equality.
    • ensure that children from disadvantaged or vulnerable populations, or from more remote areas of the country, have equal educational opportunities.
    • strengthen academic integrity and fight corruption in education.
    • establishing or strengthening links between American and Serbian academic institutions, including faculty, staff and / or students.

For all information and step-by-step instructions on how to apply, please download and read the 2022 Serbian-American Cooperation Grants Program Funding Opportunity. Please carefully follow all instructions below. Proposals that do not meet the requirements of this announcement or do not meet the stated requirements will be ineligible.

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The Town of Shreveport to organize an application process for the Income Pilot Program https://flworfound.org/the-town-of-shreveport-to-organize-an-application-process-for-the-income-pilot-program/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 00:20:00 +0000 https://flworfound.org/the-town-of-shreveport-to-organize-an-application-process-for-the-income-pilot-program/ SHREVEPORT, Louisiana (KSLA) – The City of Shreveport will open the application process for the Shreveport Universal Basic Income (UBI) program on Monday, January 10. The pilot program is a joint effort between the Town of Shreveport, the Parish of Caddo and United Way of Northwest Louisiana. The application period will last from 8:00 a.m. […]]]>

SHREVEPORT, Louisiana (KSLA) – The City of Shreveport will open the application process for the Shreveport Universal Basic Income (UBI) program on Monday, January 10.

The pilot program is a joint effort between the Town of Shreveport, the Parish of Caddo and United Way of Northwest Louisiana.

The application period will last from 8:00 a.m. on January 10 to 11:59 p.m. on January 17. Those interested in applying can click on here.

Of those eligible, 110 families will be selected to receive $ 660 per month for one year.

Residents of Shreveport who are single parents with an income below 120% of the federal poverty line. The program defines a single parent as a mother, father, step-parent, grandparent, guardian or legal guardian with a school-age child. The resident must be functionally single, whether married or not. If single, the resident cannot live with a partner.

“An estimated 25% of the citizens of Shreveport live in poverty and a guaranteed income would allow beneficiaries to meet their most urgent daily needs and unpredictable expenses. UBI with resources from the Shreveport Financial Empowerment Center would create a catalyst for better educational outcomes, substantial improvements in physical and mental health, significant reduction in predatory debt, and greater confidence in meeting basic needs.

Mayor Perkins joined Mayors for a Guaranteed Income (MGI) in 2020. MGI is a coalition of mayors committed to advancing guaranteed federal income – direct, recurring cash payments to the poor and middle class. A guaranteed income is an unconditional, monthly cash payment made directly to randomly selected families or individuals.

Shreveport City Council approved a resolution to receive $ 500,000 from MGI for the program, and the Caddo Parish Commission approved the allocation of $ 432,000 for matching funds.

“It’s important to me to support low-income single-parent households with school-aged children who often struggle to make ends meet. Many people are working and still do not have enough funds to cover basic needs. In these difficult times, it is beneficial that we, as leaders, give as much hope as possible to help our communities. I see this pilot program as an investment tool. Especially for those who are not entitled to additional help. Providing unrestricted additional income could help a single parent pay for the expenses necessary to complete their education. Perhaps relieve the stress of not having sufficient funds to pay their bills. Or even help a kid with musical instruments, medical bills, dance lessons, uniforms / fees. The possibilities are endless and my colleagues and I are honored to be part of this initiative to help improve the quality of life for our citizens in Caddo Parish.

For those who need help completing the application, Centraide’s Financial Empowerment Center will accept walk-in visits from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. The only day they will not be available is the last day of the application period, Monday January 17th, due to the holiday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr ..

In-person assistance will also be provided from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Tuesday, January 11 at the Airport Park Recreation Center and from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on January 13 at the David Raines Recreation Center.

Selected participants will be contacted approximately three weeks after the end of the application period.

Copyright 2022 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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November saw the highest disbursement to date of rental assistance from the COVID-19 program https://flworfound.org/november-saw-the-highest-disbursement-to-date-of-rental-assistance-from-the-covid-19-program/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:02:00 +0000 https://flworfound.org/november-saw-the-highest-disbursement-to-date-of-rental-assistance-from-the-covid-19-program/ States and towns paid the largest amount of rent assistance to cash-strapped tenants in November since a federal program began, the Treasury Department said in a statement Friday. The $ 2.9 billion donated is the latest sign that the program’s early problems have mostly been resolved and it is now turning to cash-strapped places. The […]]]>

States and towns paid the largest amount of rent assistance to cash-strapped tenants in November since a federal program began, the Treasury Department said in a statement Friday.

The $ 2.9 billion donated is the latest sign that the program’s early problems have mostly been resolved and it is now turning to cash-strapped places.

The latest figures show that $ 17.39 billion has been allocated to help cover rents, allowing the program to pay or allocate $ 30 billion by the end of 2021. So far, it there were over 3.1 million payments.

“We’re just seeing that people have started their programs, made them simpler and more efficient,” said Gene Sperling, who is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the $ 1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue program. President Joe Biden, in an email interview. “A lot of places move quickly and you get a lot of money faster for tenants in need. “

Diane Yentel, CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, welcomed the acceleration in disbursements.

“The efforts of the Biden administration, advocates, program administrators and others have dramatically improved Emergency Rental Assistance (ERA) programs and increased the pace of ERA distribution, keeping million people in stable housing, ”she said in a statement. “Almost 10 million people in more than 3 million households have benefited from these vital resources. With the rent arrears paid, these families have a clean slate and some housing stability to start the year.

But with the improved results of the $ 46.5 billion program concerns it will not reach all tenants who need help. The first tranche of the emergency rental assistance fund, known as ERA1, is $ 25 billion and the second, known as ERA2 and intended to be spent over a longer period. , is $ 21.5 billion.

More than 100 recipients, including large programs in states like New York and Texas, reported that they spent almost all of their ERA1 money, the Treasury said.

The problem, Sterling said, is that there isn’t much to reallocate, given that states and cities have pulled out so much money. He estimated that more than $ 1.1 billion would be allocated in the first three rounds of repayment, of which $ 875 million will be transferred from within states, mostly from state-run programs to cities and towns. counties in need.

A dozen states transfer money to communities. Georgia, for example, is transferring $ 50 million to Fulton and DeKalb counties. In Arizona, $ 39 million is transferred from the state to Maricopa County.

“This is a team effort, and we will continue to work with all cities and counties that operate their own programs so that there are no gaps in services for families across the country. ‘Arizona,’ said Tasya Peterson, spokeswoman for the Arizona Department of Economic Security. “This voluntary reallocation to Arizona population centers will help ensure that resources are available to all eligible households, regardless of jurisdiction.”

Several places will get money from a pool of reallocated funds from poorly performing states. California will receive $ 62 million, New Jersey $ 40.8 million, New York $ 27 million, and the District of Columbia $ 17.8 million.

“There won’t be huge amounts of excess funds,” Sterling said. “The reallocation will help but will not fill the gaps in large states like Texas, New York or California which have largely committed their funds and still have significant needs.”

California welcomed the additional funds, but said they fell short of needs. “While we appreciate the injection of additional federal resources from the US Treasury, California will need significantly more funds from future federal reallocations in order to continue to meet the needs of low-income California tenants affected by COVID-19 “, Business, Lourdes Castro Ramírez, secretary of the Agency for Consumer Services and Housing, said in a statement.

The New York $ 27 million may only fund 2,177 applications, New York State Office of Disability and Temporary Assistance Executive Deputy Commissioner Barbara Guinn said in a filing before state court on Monday. Guinn’s filing in a lawsuit launched by attorneys came days before a state judge ordered New York to reopen its application portal, closed in November.

Tenant advocacy groups say New York should once again accept the applications, which temporarily offer eviction protections to applicants. But lawyers representing New York have argued that the state should keep the application portal closed to avoid giving future applicants “false hope” due to the lack of available rent assistance funds.

Guinn said it was “not at all clear” whether New York would get more federal funds in March.

The initial roll-out of the federal program was hampered by slow disbursements, with administration officials publicly accusing state and municipal partners of hampering the process with excessive bureaucracy often aimed at preventing fraud.

More recently, the problem was that some parts of the country were spending all their money while others, especially parts of the South, were lagging behind.

Entities that have not committed 65% of their ERA1 money or have an expense ratio of less than 30% as of September 30, based on a Treasury formula, have faced a reallocation of the money. Recipients could avoid losing money if they submit a plan by November 15 showing how they would improve distribution or be able to get their distribution numbers above the 65% or 30% threshold .

The deadline to submit a request for the second round of reallocated funds is January 21. In accordance with the law, the process of reallocation of ERA2 funds will not begin until March 31, 2022.

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